FMC Zoanthus V (Filter + Daylight-Shot picture!) | Fauna Marin
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Item number FMC_216


Schnellübersicht: Fauna Marin Zoanthus/Palythoa are perfect to add into your Aquarium as one of the first corals. They are very colorful and easy to maintain, they are ideal for beginners. Every typ of (Nano) Aquarium becomes an eye catcher with our popular FMC frags. The small frags are aquaculture by Fauna Marin from only the most gorgeous and brightest corals and then sold to affordable prices for everyone to have a chance to give one a new home in your aquarium. Be sure to keep a lookout for the V next to each coral's name. It stands for multiple frags being available!
Ihre Vorteile:
Overnight-Express-Lieferung
Mehr als 15 Jahre Erfahrung
Premium-Korallen


FMC Zoanthus V (Filter + Daylight-Shot picture!)

Several frags of these corals are available. The corals differ only slightly in shape, but similar in size. You will receive a frag similar to the coral depicted in the photo of the same mother colony.

 

If you have any further questions, please check our Fauna Marin Support Forum, and our Fauna Marin Reefing Group on Facebook.

 

General information of Zoanthus/Palythoa corals:

  • Scientific: Zoanthus sp.
  • Common: Zoa coral
  • Origin: Indopacific
  • Size: polyps up to 1cm
  • Temperature: 75.2 °F - 80.6 °F (24°C - 27°C)
  • Feeding: Zooxanthellen / Light, Plancton 
  • Tank: >50 Liter

Zoanthus/Palythoa corals are easy to care for and are often recommended as beginner corals. They gain most of their daily nutritional requirements through the photosynthetic activity of their symbiotic Zooxanthellae, but also absorb nutrients and dissolved organic matter from the water column. They also feed on captured plankton. Zoanthid polyps do not necessarily need to be fed directly, but will benefit from occasional feedings with finely chopped frozen foods, zooplankton additives or dust food, like the Fauna Marin Coral Dust, which will help them to thrive.

Their durability makes them to be rather forgiving to less optimal water parameters and lightning conditions.

Zoanthus/Palythoa species may be placed in high as well as in moderately lit areas, they are able to tolerate moderate as well as with high and turbulent flows, however, strong currents directly directed towards the colonies may cause the polyps to stay closed. Under proper lightning and water parameters most Zoanthus/Palythoa species will grow fast- sometimes too well, spreading over rocks and eventually supersede adjacent corals.

Some Zoanthus/Palythoa species, especially those in the genera of Palythoa and Protopalythoa can be highly toxic for humans. These Zoanthids may excrete Palytoxin, one of the most toxic organic substances in the world. Normally, this will not be noticed during the reefkeeper’s normal daily routine, but can become a real danger when Palythoa or Protopalythoa species are forcibly removed or fragged. Whereas several reef keepers have reported severe health problems they suffered when handling Palythoa or Protopalythoa species, species of the Zoanthus genus are generally considered to be rather harmless, at least there is no known case of a serious intoxication caused by a Zoanthus species. Nevertheless, since it is difficult for the average hobbyist to distinguish Zoanthus, Palythoa and Protopalythoa species from each other, you should always handle Zoanthid species with proper caution. When touching them or removed them for your tank, you should always wear protective gloves and goggles, wash your hands thoroughly afterwards and avoid any eye contact.

 

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